Archive for the insects Category

The Batscan!

The Batscan!

The Texas night sky is full of life. On almost any night of the year, there are insects from ground level up to over a mile high. And where there are insects, you’ll find bats trying to catch them. For ecologists, however, this is a very challenging

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Bats eat migratory moths! Lots of them!

Bats eat migratory moths! Lots of them!

  Insect migration is one of those things that gets more amazing the more you know about it. It happens pretty much everywhere, but especially way up in the air. There’s a mind-bogglingly high number of insects traveling up there when winds are favorable, representing a huge

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The answer is: cold fronts.

The answer is: cold fronts.

The core of my dissertation research was to understand the mechanisms driving fall migration in both moths that are agricultural pests and in the insectivorous bats that eat them. Now you can read the primary results in this paper from the Journal of Animal Ecology. While I

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A river of life flowing overhead in the dark

A river of life flowing overhead in the dark

If you live in the central or southern United States right now, you’re witnessing perhaps the biggest cold front and related fall migration event of the season.  With snow up north and a steady stream of northerly winds during the night, everything that can’t survive freezing winters

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cloud lab photos on flickr

More photos from the airship set-up trip. cloud lab, part 1

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A continent-wide transect for a bat survey

A continent-wide transect for a bat survey

  In addition to setting up the insect sampling equipment and protocol, I also installed a bat detector to look for high-flying bats feeding on those high-flying insects along the way.  Here you can see a photo of me next to the box containing the equipment.  While

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What if the BBC decided to do a show about your dissertation research?

What if the BBC decided to do a show about your dissertation research?

Some time ago I learned that the BBC were planning to do a series about the science of clouds, including insects high in the atmosphere.  While I personally think it’s a fascinating topic and the press has shown interest in the past, I was dubious at first

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